How to Stop Squirting

  • Laura Rose Halliday
  • Published: May 8, 2022

Whether you’re a natural-born squirter or someone who discovered your abilities later in life, you may be wondering if it’s possible to stop squirting.

The answer is complicated.

In this article, we’ll introduce squirting including what it is and who can do it. I’ll outline some common misconceptions about squirting and the facts behind them. Finally, I’ll answer the question: is it possible to stop squirting and, if so, how?

What Does It Mean to “Squirt?”

Squirting is the discharge (usually forceful) of a large amount of fluid from the urethra during arousal or orgasm. This is commonly depicted in pornography and other forms of erotica as the ultimate expression of female sexuality and pleasure.

Is It Female Ejaculation, Squirting, or Pee?

So the question always comes up: did I squirt, or did I pee? And that’s because, for years, scientists didn’t realize there was anything to distinguish the two.

Urine comes from the bladder, so if squirting fluid also comes from the bladder then it must be urine, right? Wrong.

First, let’s define the three terms above.

Female ejaculation, or FE, is the trickle of a milky white fluid from the urethra. This happens during or post-orgasm and it can often be missed as it’ll just trickle down into the vagina and mix with the other fluids. FE is produced within the Skene’s glands.

Squirting is a more forceful expulsion of colorless, odorless fluid from the urethra. It can be a trickle, a stream, or a gush. Squirting fluid also originally comes from the Skene’s glands but it then passed through the bladder and finally out of the urethra.

And pee, well that also comes from the bladder but it has a distinct color and odor and is done purposefully.

We now know that squirting fluids are distinct from urine. How? It contains numerous elements separate from pee, like “prostate specific antigen, prostatic acidic phosphatase, prostate specific acid phosphatase, and glucose.”

So while squirting fluids contain trace amounts of urine, it’s an entirely separate fluid altogether.

Who Can Squirt?

The real question is “who can squirt naturally?” and “who can learn to squirt?

According to the most recent research on the topic, the percentage of women who can squirt naturally ranges from 10% to 54%.

As for who can learn to squirt, it’s not a topic that’s ever been researched. However, assuming no physical limitations (like lack of a Skene’s gland), squirting should be possible for any woman who wants to learn.

Common Misconceptions About Squirting

As with many topics surrounding female sexuality and pleasure, there are plenty of misconceptions. Here are three common misconceptions about squirting and the facts behind them.

Misconception #1: Squirting Always Happens During Orgasm

While squirting can occur during orgasm, it can also happen at any other point during arousal.

There’s no way to say how often it happens either way as there haven’t been any large-scale studies on the subject. This will likely vary depending on the woman.

So if your partner squirts and you’re not sure if she’s still good to go, just ask her!

Misconception #2: Squirting Looks Like It Does in Porn

While erotic videos have helped to introduce squirting to more and more people, it has done so at the expense of painting a very specific picture of the act. What do I mean by that?

Squirting, as shown in videos, is often like a geyser shooting fluids six feet across the room. It’s also usually shown to happen simultaneously with climax.

The truth is that squirting can be anywhere from a trickle to a constant stream to a burst. It can vary from woman to woman and even from session to session. So if it’s your first time squirting or feeling insecure about how you squirt, remember that pornography is a poor representation of squirting just like it is for many other things.

Misconception #3: Squirting Requires G-Spot Stimulation

If you’re trying to learn how to squirt, whether for yourself or your partner, then the number one technique offered is g-spot stimulation. And for good reason! The g-spot is a nerve-filled spot within the vagina. It’s actually the internal extension of the clitoris, hence all the nerve endings.

But just like different types of stimulation work to make different women orgasm, the same can be said for squirting.

Whether it’s g-spot stimulation, clitoral stimulation, vaginal penetration, or even anal penetration, there are plenty of techniques you can use to make yourself or your partner squirt. You can even combine techniques (highly recommended!) if you’re having trouble getting there.

Rub her clit, suck her clit, even lick her ass or experiment with anal fingering. There are so many techniques to try!

So think about what usually brings you to orgasm and maybe combine it with another technique. For example, clitoral stimulation combined with g-spot stimulation. Or ask your partner what she usually likes to do while she’s masturbating.

How Can I Stop Squirting?

If you’re a natural squirter, you may have conflicting feelings on the matter.

On the one hand, squirting is often revered in pornography and seen as the “ultimate” sexy act. On the other hand, it’s an involuntary result of sexual pleasure that can be embarrassing or shameful for the squirter.

So if you’re a squirter who wants more control over this reflex, you may be asking, “how can I stop squirting?”

The answer is multifaceted.

First, for many natural squirters, it’s not always possible to stop.

Squirting, just like an orgasm, is an involuntary response to stimulation. Is it possible sometimes to hold it off? Sure. But it’s often uncomfortable to do so and it can lead to sexual repression and resentment in a relationship.

Second, squirting is a natural reaction to pleasure that is nothing to be ashamed of. So even if you are someone who can hold back, it’ll only serve to hold back your body’s full expression of pleasure.

So now I’ll ask you a question in return: why do you want to stop yourself from experiencing the fullness of pleasure?

There are many reasons a woman may feel compelled to stop squirting. Perhaps it makes her feel shameful or dirty. Maybe her partner has voiced disgust or disapproval. Or maybe you just don’t know what it is.

Once you’ve discovered the true reason for why you want to stop, I suggest you address it at the root instead of spiting your sexuality.

Tips to Control Your Squirting

If you’re still keen on stopping squirting, even if it’s just as you work through the hesitations you have surrounding it, here are a few tips.

You’ll need to focus on controlling your pelvic floor muscles. These are the muscles we involuntary use so as not to pee when we sneeze or jump or otherwise jolt our bodies while our bladders are full.

Considering the bladder also plays a role in squirting, it makes sense that controlling the bladder will help to stem the flow of squirting fluids.

The number one way to control the pelvic floor muscles is to practice kegel exercises throughout the day. That is, clench and unclench the muscles to build them up.

During sex, you can also try positions that require you to kneel as opposed to lay down. Sex positions like cowgirl, reverse cowgirl, and the amazon will naturally clench the pelvic floor muscles. While it’s possible to still squirt in this position, it’s unlikely.

Conclusion

There are a lot of conflicting feelings around squirting. For some, it’s a pleasurable experience full of female empowerment and awe. For others, it’s a shameful or embarrassing experience that they wish they could stop.

While I encourage you to fully embrace your body and its natural functions, I understand there are a lot of things that can make that difficult. So, if in the meantime you want to have more control over your squirting, then follow the steps I outlined in the section above.