The Complete Guide to Queefing: Everything You Need to Know

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If you’ve read my guide to the greatest sex positions, you’ll know that very little fazes me in the sack. I’m open to trying anything, no matter how noisy, wet, or messy! From full-body shaking climaxes to squirting orgasms and even nipple sucking, when it comes to pushing sexual boundaries, I’m fearless.

But when, during an especially intense lovemaking session last night, my pussy decided to ‘fart’, I realized it was about time I tackled one of the most intriguing, and misunderstood, of all bodily functions – queefing!

Queefing is certainly ‘out there’ in the public consciousness, yet few people are ‘queef-aware’, or at least not nearly as much as they should be! Queefing is where air becomes trapped in the folds of skin, known as ‘rugae’, at the back of the vagina before being released. It is perfectly normal, healthy, natural and nothing to ashamed of, yet shame, fear or revulsion is exactly how many women, and men, respond; and that’s what I want to change!

If you or your partner has a vagaina, becoming ‘queef-literate’ will give your sex life a massive boost! Learning what causes queefing and how to respond when it happens gives you the chance to:

  • Practice sex positivity!
  • Deepen understanding and improve communication!
  • Boost enjoyment and get back to business without missing a beat!

Queefing is fun, safe and natural and some people even find it SEXY! So in this complete guide, I’ll show you everything you need to know about this little-understood bodily phenomenon! I’ll teach you what queefing is, what causes it, how to queef more, how to queef less, and everything in between!

What is a queef?

A queef is what happens when a small amount of air gets trapped in the folds of skin at the back of the vaginal canal – called the rugae – and then gets released. If you’ve never heard this term before, you may have heard one of the many slang terms such as a ‘vaginal fart’, or, more simply, a ‘pussy fart’. If you want to get even cruder, a queef is also known as a ‘beaver burp’, a ‘muff puff’, a ‘gash gass’, or, for breathtaking levels of grotesqueness, a ‘flap slapper’. But ‘queef’ is not only the most ‘politically correct’ term, it’s also the most accurate term!

You see a queef isn’t a fart at all – it’s just air. The word queef comes from the Scottish-English term ‘quiff’, meaning a puff of air and that’s exactly what causes a queef; a puff of air coming out of the vagina. After all, what goes in, must come out! Even if you’ve never heard of queefing before, you may have actually heard a queef and put it down to flatulence. That’s because a queef often sounds much like flatulence from the anus, or a Whoopee cushion, albeit without the awful stench!

Queefing is actually more like a whistle than a fart, as it doesn’t involve the build-up of intestinal gas. It’s air and it happens whenever air is drawn up into or pushed into the vagina and then expelled!

What causes a queef?

There are many activities that cause queefs, but queefs are typically caused when air is forced into the vagina by the pumping action of a penis during sex. As the penis enters the vagina, it displaces existing air and forces it through the seal between the penis and vagina, causing the fart-like sound.

During sex, most women can feel a certain amount of air being forced into their vagina, but that alone doesn’t always result in queefing. The three most common ways that queefs occur are:

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  • When there isn’t a tight seal between the vaginal opening and the object being inserted – the object of insertion, such as a finger, toy, penis, or even a tongue.
  • When the object of insertion goes into the vagina diagonally.
  • When the object of insertion goes all the way out, and all the way in, again and again! As this study showed, even fingering (illustrated below) can cause queefing!

Queefing can also happen after sex as the unblocked air escapes from the vagina. During sex, vaginas do what’s called ‘tenting’ – they elongate and create more space for the object of insertion. After sex, without the object in the way, the vagina contracts and the air is expelled. As there’s little stopping the air from escaping, post-coital queefs tend to be lower in pitch and volume.

Interestingly, the amount of expelled air and the pitch of the queef are directly related to the size of the penis. The bigger the penis, the more air is displaced and the more air, the louder the sound can be!

Labia size and shape are also factors in queef volume and pitch, with short and thin labia producing loud, high pitched queefs!

But queefing doesn’t only happen during or after sex! There are a wide range of other queef-promoting activities that you should know. Exercising is one of the main ones, as queefs can happen when you run, jog, stand up, sit down, or dance. It’s perfectly normal to queef during exercise and you shouldn’t be embarrassed or ashamed when it happens!

There are plenty of other lesser-known causes of queefing such as getting a pelvic exam, inserting a tampon, using a cap or a cup, inserting a female condom or even doing nothing at all! Somehow, air gets into the vagina and comes out, vibrating the labia and making a noise!

Maybe you queef because you pushed a baby out of your vagina and your body is shaped differently now!

Maybe you queef because something turned you on and your vagina excitedly took a little ‘gulp’ of air!

Queefing isn’t weird – it’s just the body doing its thing and that leads me on to the strangest reason why queefs happen; some women can queef on command! That’s right, by intentionally drawing air in with their pubococcygeus muscles and then releasing, some women can queef as entertainment, as music-making or just as a celebration!

According to this study intentional queefing is possible when the muscles around the reproductive organs are relaxed, this lets more air enter the vagina! Besides sex, this can happen during things like sit-ups, jogging and even dancing or whilst doing yoga! In fact, there are plenty of queef-enabling things that you can do!

Is queefing safe and healthy?

Queefing is a perfectly normal and natural bodily function and is nothing to be worried about. It’s simply a matter of air entering and exiting your vagina and shouldn’t be a cause for concern. However, queefing is a little taboo so it may make you feel ashamed, but it’s a perfectly normal bodily function. If you queef during sex, it’s important to know that you’re not actually bad! It’s just your body being your body and there’s no need to panic. When you hear yourself queef, simply stop what you’re doing, gently remove everything and push to expel the air.

In terms of being safe, the only thing you want to avoid is having air accumulate in your vagina until it starts to hurt. Potentially, this could lead to an air embolism caused by air moving into your veins or arteries that blocks blood flow, although the chances of this happening are statistically low.

While queefing is perfectly healthy, there is such a thing as abnormal queefing, which, according to Sexinfo Online, a sex website by the University of California Santa Barbra, is defined as a noise combined with another symptom such as pain, a strong odour, or a strong need to urinate. In other words, queefing should be purely something you hear, and if there are any other feelings, smells or issues, it’s advisable to talk to your doctor.

The three potential causes for concern that you should know are:

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP): This is where one or more organs drop down into the vagina, causing the queefing sound to occur. POPs are typically caused by old age, obesity, childbirth or surgery. According to this study, having a POP doesn’t make you any more likely to queef than someone without one and it’s not a major cause of queefing.

Bacterial vaginosis: This is the medical term for a bacterial infection in the vagina and may cause queefs to be somewhat painful.

Vaginal fistulas: These are holes in the vaginal canal that open into the urinary tract and could be the reason why queefs have a distinct smell. In extremely rare cases, you may have a rectovaginal fistula where the vaginal canal opens into the colon, something that may be caused by prolonged childbirth or Crohn’s disease.

Even if your queefs are a signal that something is wrong, there’s no need to be ashamed. Queefing is natural – so queef loudly and proudly but seek medical help if you encounter pain or a funny smell!

3 queefing myths you may have heard

As queefing is generally considered taboo and queefs sound so similar to passing wind, embarrassment and shame are usually the worst side effect of queefing. However, there are more harmful beliefs, or myths, that are surprisingly prevalent. Here are three such queefing myths that you may have heard.

Myth #1. Queefing is a sign of having a sexually transmitted infection (STI)
Fact:
There is no known medical link between queefing and having an STI. Queefing is simply air becoming trapped in the vagina and then being released through the entrance of the vagina.

Myth #2. Queefing is a sign of infidelity or of having multiple sexual partners
Fact: There is no correlation between queefing and the number of sexual partners a person may have had or whether they have been faithful. As this study showed, queefing occurs when the muscles around the reproductive system are relaxed. This is linked to levels of arousal and has nothing to do with past sexual history.

Myth #3. Queefing is a sign of a medical condition
Fact:
Queefing very rarely has anything to do with being ill or having a medical condition. In fact, this study found that women who had a pelvic organ prolapse (POP) were no more likely to queef than healthy women who didn’t.

How common is queefing?

There are very few clinical case studies with decent sample sizes dedicated to the prevalence of queefing, however, according to this 2009 study, 12.8 percent of Dutch women between the ages of 45 and 85 reported queefing, while this Iranian study found that roughly 20 percent of women report never having experienced queefing.

Anecdotally, this Reddit thread suggests that queefing is a normal and common part of having sex, albeit a random and unexpected part! When you have a penis pumping in and out of a vagina, it’s natural to expect air to become trapped and released, causing an embarrassing sound!

Similarly, queefing can happen during a range of non-sexual activities, such as during a pelvic exam or mid-way through a yoga class! Queefing during or after sex, as well as during exercise, is incredibly common.

How do people react to queefs?

There’s a number of ways that people respond to queefs ranging from ignorance – i.e. people who assume the sound is passing wind – to indifference, to excitement: queef fetishists actually get a sexual kick out of the sound! It largely depends on the context; queefing in public – such as during a yoga class – will be potentially embarrassing as the sound could be misconstrued as flatulence. However, queefing during intercourse is widely accepted and generally causes little to no bother.

Over two-thirds of the respondents to the Dutch study reported feeling somewhat bothered by queefing during sex, however over 90 percent of the women interviewed for the Iranian study felt understandably embarrassed when they queefed in a public setting.

Anecdotally, women report feeling a wide range of emotions and feelings when they queef during sex. Some women find it extremely embarrassing and quite a turn-off, while others have learned to embrace it and even laugh it off with a light-hearted comment about their pussy saying “Thank you”!

Men’s reactions to queefing are similarly diverse, with some men finding it a turn-off and others finding it kind of hot. Most men simply laugh it off and get back to business, but some men describe themselves as queef fetishists and get a sexual thrill from the sound of a woman queefing!

A huge part of the reaction is down to how much people understand about queefing. Those in the know, who realize it’s just air, are less likely to be bothered by the sound than those who aren’t familiar with this natural and amazing bodily function!

How to respond to queefing

Queefing is normal and natural, but there’s no denying that the ‘farting’ sound can really kill the mood in the bedroom! So, what should you do when you queef? Or, how should you respond when your partner queefs?

As a woman, you should never apologize for a queef – you didn’t do anything wrong! A queef is simply your body’s way of dealing with trapped air. As you don’t want the air to build up to the point when it becomes painful, the most appropriate response is simply to stop what you are doing, gently remove the object of insertion (the finger, toy, or penis) and give your vagina some space. Try to contract your pelvic floor muscles and push until the trapped air is released, and then get right back to business!

Depending on the situation, you may ignore a queef, laugh it off, or simply celebrate it! Queefing is a great opportunity to model sex positivity, and you could say something funny and positive, like “My vagina just whistled!”, or simply “Queefing!” Being light-hearted kills any embarrassment you may feel and can also help your partner if they aren’t sure about what a queef is or how they should respond.

Another great response is letting out a sigh as if to say, “Thank goodness that build-up of air is no longer making things so uncomfortable down there! We can get back to sex!” A more jokey response such as saying something like, “That’s my vagina saying thank you!” is sure to elicit a smile or even laughter from whoever you’re with and will help things flow right along!

For men who hear their partner queef, it’s important to respond positively and never say or do anything that could be interpreted as critical. Your partner didn’t do anything wrong and she may even feel embarrassed about a perfectly normal and natural bodily function! After, it’s just air!

One of the best responses is to laugh it off and make a playful comment about how funny or sexy you find the queefing sound. You could say something like, “Oh, your pussy sounds happy!”, or, “That pussy talkin’ to me!” This helps kill the tension in the situation and puts your partner at ease.

If your partner queefs, you should be aware that they are perhaps finding the build-up of air inside their vagina quite uncomfortable! Give them time to work the air out until they feel comfortable enough to continue. During this time, you could try another fun, sexy activity such as nipple play, or orgasmic massage, until they are ready to get back to sex!

How to queef

While queefing is generally thought of a taboo or embarrassing fact of life, there are plenty of reasons why you, or your partner, may want to queef more! If you have a vagina, you may find the build-up of air creates a pleasurable sensation that gets you off! If your partner has a queef fetish then what better treat them than with all the hot, erotic queefing sounds they can handle? In this section, I’ll explain exactly how to queef more!

Relax with deep breathing

The key to queefing is relaxing your body with a series of deep breaths. This helps relax the muscles around your reproductive organs and draw air in. To release the air, you simply contract your pelvic floor muscles (the muscles you tense when you try to stop yourself from peeing) and push the air out!

Try Kegal exercises

Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegal exercise, teach you how to actively tense (squeeze) the muscles in your pelvic floor. You can learn these exercises from a physiotherapist or online and complete them in just a few minutes per day.

To do a standard Kegal exercise, simply:

  • Tighten your pelvic floor muscles (as if holding in urine) and hold tightly for a count of 3 to 5 seconds.
  • Relax the muscles and count for another 3 to 5 seconds.
  • Repeat this exercise 10 times, three times a day (morning, afternoon, and night) until you start seeing results!

Women who strengthen their pelvic floor muscles are less likely to queef spontaneously, but they are also more able to queef on demand! This is because strong muscles help you expel trapped air in your vagina and queef more readily!

Try Queef-enabling sex positions!

The third way to queef more is to try certain sex positions that encourage or cause queefing! In general, any position that calls for you to bend over or go upside down with do the trick! One of the most popular options is the Reverse Cowgirl and here’s exactly how it’s done!

The Reverse Cowgirl

Also known as: The Asian Cowgirl, the ‘Rodeo Drive’, or ‘Half Way Around the World’.

Technique: Have your man lie on his back and straddle his hips while facing towards his feet. Squat down until his erect shaft enters you and then kneel down so you can start riding him comfortably. To get some good queefs, you’ll want to ride him all the way up and down, lifting off at the top so that the head of his shaft can forcibly expel the trapped air as you sink down onto him again!

Advantages:

  • The Reverse Cowgirl lets you bob all the way up and down your guy’s shaft, helping to push the maximum amount of air inside your vagina – perfect for loud queefs!
  • As queefing is also caused by diagonal thrusts, this position lets you lean back, forward or to either side to change up the angle of the thrusts and get some really great queefing action!

Disadvantage:

  • Unless you’re quite athletic, this position can take its toll on your knees! One solution is to try a sex stool; the strong, elasticated bands take some of the weight off your knees and let you bounce longer and harder for some epic queefing!

Another great sex position for queefing is called the Squat Thruster!

The Squat Thruster

Also known as: The ‘Pile Driver’, or the ‘Butter Churner’.

Technique: Lie on your back and adopt the ‘bicycle’ yoga position with your feet raised over your head and your arms supporting your lower back. Have your man squat down over your butt and hold your thighs while he thrusts into you with his erect shaft!

Advantages:

  • If you’re looking to queef as much as possible, the Squat Thruster ticks ALL the right boxes! You are not only hunched over but you’re inverted too! This helps to open your vagina as much as possible and maximizes the amount of air that becomes trapped, leading to some very loud queefs!
  • As a type of rear entry position, this move lets your man thrust deeply into your vagina to push as much air as possible inside you and then pull all the way out, before repeating! This is one of the best ways to queef as it pushes the maximum amount of air out between the side of your vaginal walls and his shaft.
  • By parting your legs, your man can open up your vagina so that it accepts plenty of air. Even if you have quite strong pelvic floor muscles, you won’t be able to tense up and easily control how much air gets released as your guy thrusts into you!

Disadvantage:

  • If you have any sort of neck issues, then this isn’t the position for you! Even if you put a cushion or pillow down on the bed, you are still placing most of your weight onto your back and neck muscles.

Besides trying the Reverse Cowgirl and Squat Thruster sex positions, you can also ask your man to try the following things to make you queef as much as possible:

  • Ask him to thrust as hard and fast into you as possible to trap the maximum volume of air and produce the loudest queefs!
  • Have him pull out after every thrust, before thrusting deeply back inside. This ‘all the way out, all the way in’ technique is one of the best queef-enabling moves you can try!
  • Ask him to blow air into your vagina during sex. You can also make this part of foreplay to enjoy that your vaginal is completely aired out before the sex starts!

Try changing positions during sex!

Lastly, a sure-fire way to queef more is to switch up positions! According to research from the International Urogynecology Journal, women are more likely to queef when they switch from one sex position to another. Changing positions will give your vaginal time to open up and experience thrusts from a wider variety of angles. So, whether you go from Cowgirl to Reverse cowgirl, or from Missionary to Doggy Style, you can be sure that your vadge will let you know when it’s having fun!


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How to avoid queefing

The problem with queefing is that it happens unexpectedly, and there’s often no telling where you’ll be when your vagina decides to let loose! You could be in the middle of a yoga class, or even at work when your vagina decides to make a contribution! As queefing in any public setting is likely to be awkward and embarrassing, this begs the question – how can you avoid queefing?

Tense up

As queefing tends to happen more when the muscles surrounding your reproductive organs are relaxed, the perfect anecdote to queefing is staying tense. If you find you are prone to queefing during sex, simply remove the object of insertion – finger, toy, penis or tongue – to give your vagina space and then contract your pelvic floor muscles (as if holding in pee) to expel any unwanted air. When you get back to business, keep your pelvic floor muscles tightly clenched to make your vagina resist any air that an object of insertion might try to push in.

If you are trying to avoid queefing during non-sexual activities, you can apply the same technique of clenching your pelvic floor muscles to reduce the build-up of air in your vagina!

Try Kegal exercises

Women who regularly do pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegal exercises, are much less likely to spontaneously queef during sex or at other times than those who don’t. Kegel exercises teach you how to actively tense (squeeze) the muscles in your pelvic floor and this gives you control over when and where you expel trapped air from your vagina. Just as Kegal exercise can help you queef on demand by forcibly expelling air, they can also help you queef less!

Fortunately, Kegal exercises take just a few minutes per day and are super-easy to do! I outlined exactly how to do a Kegal exercise in the previous section, check it out! If you’d like to reduce the risks of queefing, practicing Pelvic Floor Exercises will work wonders. You’ll have much greater control over the flow of air into and out of your vagina and you’ll be able to greatly limit the amount of air that goes in, reducing the chances of queefing!

Try inactive sex positions!

The third way to queef less is to try sex positions that don’t open your vagina up quite as much, such as standard missionary position. You can greatly limit queefing during sex by choosing a position that doesn’t involve being bent over or upside down. Basically, any position that doesn’t call for you to be ‘hunched up’ or ‘crouching’ position will work just fine! Fortunately, one of the best positions for queefing less is also the one position that most women report being the best for reaching orgasm – the Coital Alignment Technique, or C.A.T.! Here’s how it’s done!

The C.A.T.

Also known as: The ‘Coital Alignment Technique’, or ‘The Cat’.

Technique: You lie on your back with one of your knees bent and the other lying flat on the bed. Have your man lie on top as if in standard missionary position, except instead of being chest-to-chest, his chest is farther up and to one side, over either your left or right shoulder. By keeping one of your knees bent, his shaft will be pushed into near-constant contact with your clitoris, helping to power you towards a mind-blowing orgasm! Instead of the backward and forward motion of standard missionary, the C.A.T. position calls for more of an up and down movement.

Advantages:

  • The C.A.T. lets you remain quite inactive and keeps your vagina as tightly closed as possible, minimizing the amount of air that can become trapped. Less air means fewer queefs!
  • As the C.A.T. movement is more up and down than in and out, you don’t get the queef-causing thrusting where the penis goes all the way out and then all the way in, forcing trapped air out and producing a queef!
  • Not only is the C.A.T. a great queef-inhibitor, but it’s also great for orgasms! A study published in the Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy found that 73 percent of women can orgasm with this technique!

Disadvantage:

  • The up and down motion is quite tricky and can take a while to learn. This position is sometimes called ‘Grinding the corn’ as that’s the action that most couples feel it works best in.

Besides the C.A.T., another great queef-inhibiting position is the Spoon. Here’s how to do it:

The Spoon

Also known as: The ‘Sidewinder’.

Technique: Lie on your side, facing your partner. Raise one of your legs to let your man enter you. Once he gets close enough to thrust inside you, close your legs so that the base of his shaft becomes trapped against your clitoris. Have him thrust into you while you kiss, hug and caress each other!

Advantages:

  • If you’re trying to queef as little as possible, this intimate face-to-facing position is PERFECT! One of the best ways to prevent a queef is to close your legs and clench your pelvic floor muscles so as this position lets you keep your legs closed, so you really can’t ask for more!
  • If you’re concerned that thrusting in and out will open up your vagina too much, you can ask your man to use grinding and circular movements instead. This not only increases clitoral stimulation but it also keeps your vagina as closed as possible and prevents air from getting inside and become trapped.
  • If you’re looking for an inactive sex position that minimizes the chances of queefing, the Spoon is ideal. You can lie more or less completely still while your man grinds into you and this cuts down the chances that you’ll accidentally queef out trapped air!

Disadvantages:

  • In terms of minimizing queefing, there really aren’t any disadvantages to the Spoon! However, the grinding motion can leave you and your partner feeling less satisfied compared with thrusting sex positions. It may take you some trial and error before you find a good rhythm that keeps you both satisfied!

Besides trying the C.A.T. and Spoon positions and other inactive sex positions, you can also ask your man to try the following things to make you queef as less as possible:

  • Ask him to use slower thrusts during intercourse so that air doesn’t become trapped.
  • Have him avoid deep, fast penetration, to minimize the chances of air building up in your vagina.
  • Ask him to avoid pulling out after every thrust
  • Tell him not to blow air into the vagina during oral sex.

Avoid changing positions during sex

As I noted earlier, research from the International Urogynecology Journal suggests that sticking with one position during sex is the best way of avoiding queefing. The more you change positions, the more likely you are to queef! Try to stick to relatively inactive positions such as missionary and you just might prevent your vadge from becoming, well, musical! Although this hasn’t been proven is any medical sense, a laid back position like traditional missionary won’t open up your vagina too much and will limit the amount of air that gets trapped inside!

If you’re looking to minimize your queef-game, stick to just one or two positions during your sex sessions and you should be fine! By moving your body as little as possible, there’s much less chance that any air will become trapped and need to make an appearance during the proceedings!

Conclusion

If you were curious about queefing and wanted to know more, I hope that this fun and entertaining guide has answered all your questions!

As you’ve seen, queefing is perfectly normal and natural and the best response is simply to laugh it off and carry on! If you’re a vulva-haver and were wondering what queefing is, rest assured that everyone with a vagina does it, often when they least expect it! It’s nothing to be embarrassed about and you should never feel shame or guilt – it’s just trapped air! Your body is wonderful, so treat it that way and own any sounds that come out!

If your partner queefs and you’ve been left wondering how to respond, hopefully, this guide has dispelled any doubts you may have had! Queefing is a widely misunderstood bodily function but it shouldn’t be a passion killer. Once you understand that it’s just air, you may look (and listen!) to queefing in a whole new light. Who knows, you may even start to find it a turn on and see as PROOF that sex has been enjoyable for both of you!

While I’ve tried to make this guide as comprehensive as possible, there is plenty more to learn. So if you’re left feeling puzzled or confused, reach out to me in the comments section and I’ll do my best to get back to you and answer any questions or queries you may have!

Queefing is fun, so if you have any funny queefing stories that you’d like to share, please give me a shout out in the comments section below!

 

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